Could not resolve host: 86-edu.allmediacloud.com Win a copy of Almost Isn’t Good Enough by @WayneElsey of @Soles4Souls | Live Intentionally

Win a copy of Almost Isn’t Good Enough by @WayneElsey of @Soles4Souls

almost isnt good enoughToday we’re reviewing, discussing, and giving away Almost Isn’t Good Enough by Wayne Elsey. Keep reading to learn how you can win a free copy.

In Almost Isn’t Good Enough, Wayne Elsey, founder and CEO Soles4Souls, challenges the conventional ways most non-profits operate and shares the principles that have made Soles4Souls successful.

Wayne began his career in the shoe business and rose through the ranks to become president of the company. A passion for putting shoes on the feet of those who have none led him to leave the corporate world and start Soles4Souls. What sets Wayne and Soles4Souls apart from most non-profits is their whatever-it-takes, results-oriented operating philosophy, which is common in the business sector but not so much among non-profits.

Each chapter in Almost Isn’t Good Enough, explains a different principle such as:

  • Hire the best and pay the best
  • Awareness is worthless, but engagement is priceless
  • Cash creates margin. Make no apologies for increasing the bottom line.
  • Make decisions
  • Take action
  • Focus on solutions not processes

Personal Thoughts

Almost Isn’t Good Enough is for non-profit leaders what Rework is for small business leaders – a kick in the pants!

Some people will bristle at what sounds like bringing corporate culture to non-profits, but I found the book to be a breath of fresh air. A lot of non-profits seem to be more concerned with not rocking the boat – not upsetting donors, not doing anything that might fail, avoiding change – than solving problems. In my opinion, we need more boldness, more risk-taking, more action-oriented people in the non-profit sector.

If you are involved in a non-profit, ministry, or church, I think you’ll find Almost Isn’t Good Enough refreshing, challenging and motivating.

Discussion

  1. In what ways have you seen non-profits get bogged down from indecision, lack of action, an unclear mission, or fear of failure?
  2. Which of the principles above resonates with you most? Why?
  3. How could your own non-profits, ministry, or church be better if it was more decisive, action-oriented, and solution oriented?

Get a Free Book

I’ve got 2 copies of Almost Isn’t Good Enough to give away. To win one…

  1. Retweet this post or share it on Facebook, and
  2. Post a comment that addresses one of the discussion questions  (include your Facebook or Twitter usename in your comment so I can connect your comment to your share/tweet).

Get multiple entries into the drawing by sharing/commenting once each day.

I’ll draw two winners at 5 PM Eastern Monday February 14.

If you’d like to buy a copy go to http://www.wayneelsey.com/almostisntgoodenoughbook/. 100% of book proceeds go to Soles4Souls. For each book purchased, TEN people in need will receive shoes.

19 Responses to “Win a copy of Almost Isn’t Good Enough by @WayneElsey of @Soles4Souls”

  1. Hi Paul,
    When people see real action and concrete solutions they are more likely to support the non-profit and become involved.

    People’s time and resources are limited and they want to know that their contributions make a real difference in the world.
    (@laurawestkong)

  2. Just today I was challenged by a newly formed nonprofit in our community that has a great vision – but a discouraging lack of action. Even when actions are suggested, they’re brushed aside in favor of reiterating the vision. I am all about casting vision and then taking action. Even little steps in the right direction creates change. I’m hoping to become involved with this nonprofit to help translate this dreaming into doing. I’ve looked at this book before, and it sounds great!

  3. Hi Paul,

    I think that many not-for-profits are collaborative organizations, and for that reason, they attract collaborative leaders. Instead of making quick decisions, many decisions require committee approval rather than respond quickly to changes or opportunities.

    Hiring strong, decisive leaders and staff could make many not-for-profits much more effective, nimble, and agile.

    • Asa, I think you’re right. I don’t think boards and committees are bad in and of themselves, but you need action-oriented leaders on them. Additionally, if they don’t meet very often, they ought to give wide latitude to the staff who do the day-to-day operations, and be able to convene on short notice if big, urgent decisions are needed to make the most of an opportunity.

  4. I’ve seen an organization afflicted by all those things you listed. Because they feared alienating what they thought were their major contributors, they didn’t want to risk rocking the boat with any new thing of substance. Once you try to please everyone, you end up pleasing no one and get stuck maintaining the status quo. I’d like a copy of this book to help my current organization avoid as much of this as possible. Thanks for the opportunty! I’m @TonjaC.

  5. Hi Paul,

    I look forward to reading this book whether I purchase it or win one. 🙂 I would like to run a non-profit of my own one day so I feel it will be very useful.

    Of the principles listed, three resonate with me even in my current position with a local government.

    ?Make decisions
    ?Take action
    ?Focus on solutions not processes

    Although the upper eschelan doesn’t have many troubles making a decision, taking action and focusing on solutions over process is difficult. I am an action girl. When someone hands me something that can be done in 10 minutes or less, I do it now, not later.

    I see us do the six sigma research and spend literally months on improving a process and then…nothing. That is the pinnacle of frustration for me. I live for results, especially after planning completely to produce them.

    I feel the biggest obstacle for businesses of all kinds today is fear of change, and I volunteer with many who exhibit this challenge. I am blessed to volunteer with some who embrace change and charge forward on the path less traveled and they prosper where others lag because of this.

    I’ll be sure to check back in after I’ve read it. Thanks Paul!

    Much success to you!
    Meaza AKA @myaffirmations)

    • Hi Meaza!

      >> I would like to run a non-profit of my own one day

      What are you waiting for?

      >>Although the upper eschelan doesn’t have many troubles making a decision, taking action and focusing on solutions over process is difficult.

      What could you do right now to help your organization become solution oriented?

  6. “In what ways have you seen non-profits get bogged down from indecision, lack of action, an unclear mission, or fear of failure?”

    I’ve seen this happen when the leadership is afraid to make decisions of letting people go when their personality, integrity, etc. does not line up with the ministry they claim to want. When I asked the leader why a certain person was still with the organization after repeated angry outbursts, deceit, and other actions, the answer was “how do you fire a volunteer?”

    Thankfully, the person has been designated one assignment within the ministry and limited in other areas. Since action was taken, the ministry has begun to flourish.

    • Karen, that’s a great example. I also frequently see leaders who are afraid to confront volunteers who show up late, come unprepared, etc. We can do better!

  7. Karen (@karensdavis) Reply February 11, 2011 at 9:03 am

    I’m excited about your Rework comment. Loved that book and if this is a non-profit version I will definitely have to grab it.

    Making decisions–and sticking with them is what resonates. Nothing is more frustrating than working when there is no real decision-maker or follow-through on decisions made. It’s impossiblee to lead your area when there is nothing but chaos at the top. Or how about when decisions are made by leadership that is disconnected from the people who will actually be affected? Decisions made in a vacuum can be disasterous.

    Looking forward to the read!

  8. Sounds like a good read…and free books rock! Hope I win.

  9. Oh yeah and I’m on twitter at @dbuckham

  10. Last day! This afternoon I’ll draw the winners. Just a reminder that every day you comment and share/tweet you get another entry in the drawing.

  11. Congrats to Tonja (@TonjaC) and Karen (@KarenSDavis) who have each won a copy of Almost Isn’t Good Enough!

    Thanks to everyone who commented, shared and tweeted the post.

    For those who didn’t win, I encourage you to pick up a copy at http://www.wayneelsey.com/almostisntgoodenoughbook/ Remember for every book purchased there, 10 people in need will get shoes.

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